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Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Metro Emergency Transport System aides after tornado in Joplin, Mo.

The strength of this city is evident through the work that Metro Emergency Transport System is doing to help people trapped or injured after one of the biggest tornados in U.S. history hit Joplin, Mo.The tornado left a six mile path and has claimed 116 lives. St. John's Regional Medical Center has been severely damaged and Main Street has been hit so hard that it is difficult for locals to navigate streets they have driven on for years.

Many of the METS team's homes have been affected by the tornado yet they are taking long shifts away from their families. Additionally, the communities outside Joplin have demonstrated immense support for Joplin. Paramedics have come from all over Missouri and the border states to assist in cleaning up after a disaster that requires more hands than usual.

Linda Brinkoff of the Metro Emergency Transport System looks up to check the incoming weather.

A house is destroyed but the closet hangers and wall paintings are left virtually untouched.

Linda Brinkoff walks through damage in the backyard of a woman that called for assistance to be transported.

Two people wait by the train tracks in Joplin, Mo. following the tornado.

A family portrait lies on the ground in front of an apartment complex that was virtually leveled on 20th st.

Jay Stoney of the Metro Emergency Transport System takes a smoke break on McClelland Blvd.


Joplin residents search through rubble for missing neighbors and loved ones.

Wheelchairs sit outside the Greenbriar Nursing Home that was destroyed in Joplin tornado.

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